Ummm, Guess What? PLEASE READ


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Ummm,  we are moving! Err,  to a new Web address,  not another duty station. Although,  you could equate it to that. Anyways,  when we move (sooner than you think) we will need you to follow us there.

We don’t want to lose you. That could make us look like bad parents. And we maaayyyy have lost a kid or two before. Just saying… We don’t want to lose you either.

So please follow us at http://www.chaosorganized25.com

And please don’t make me beg. I look really unattractive when I do.

How Do I Set Up My Child’s Services at Our New Duty Station?


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The dust is finally starting to settle down on our pcs roller coaster ride. The boxes are almost unpacked and I’m starting to get the layout of the land. The first important step I need to take next is to set up our children’s services. But how do I do that? Well I am here to give you a little help.

If you didn’t know- once you change Tricare regions you will need to get all new prescriptions for your referrals. We went from TriWest to TriNorth, because we switched Tricare regions we have to get new referrals before our children are able to start receiving services again. Which means we had to go to our new PCM to get the new referrals to our specialists to get the new referrals for our services and prescriptions.

I would suggest calling to make a appointment with your child’s PCM ASAP. If you are unable to get a realistic appointment day scheduled, try asking if they have a clinic case manager or speaking with someone at the base patient advocacy department. For example, we arrive mid July. We were given an appointment date of mid August. Bug has a rare medical condition that requires mail ordered supplies and medication. We would be out of those items if we waiter until the system worked. Therefore, I had to call the base patient advocacy who informed me they actually have clinic case managers. The case manager was able to get us next day appointments. Now all our referrals to their new specialists have been placed and we even have scheduled a few appointments with the specialists.

It really just takes time and patience. One last piece of advice is to alert all parties involved of your move. A month prior to our pcs I informed the medical supply company that we would be moving. They were then able to alert the new branch of our incoming and our needs. This worked well as the new branch called us and set up a delivery before we even seen by the specialist. They also called our insurance to see what needed to be done on their end to speed the process along.

Tip{py} Tuesday…The movie called “Life”


I came across an awesome facebook post today about how one mother is intentionally limiting her kids’ use of electronics.  She wants them to hone social skills, the art of conversation, and not miss teachable moments because they are too buried in technology to interact with her.  Her post can be found here.  A lot of what she said resonated with me.  We try to monitor and limit our kids’ use of technology (i.e., our oldest is able to play angry birds once his homework is done, etc…) but I know it is a crutch I use at times.  Recently we were at a friend’s BBQ and the kids had played outside for the first hour or so we were there.  After eating, I let them go in the house and watch a movie.  She didn’t have children of her own yet, so there wasn’t much for them to play with beyond what we had brought with us.  I think of that type of technology use as “survival,” so to speak.  I definitely don’t want to give the impression that my kids never have screen time, but I like to think that it is a reasonable amount for a 4 and 6 year old.

The other day we were heading home from one of our many appointments (speech and OT) and the kids were upset because they wanted to watch a movie on the DVD player in our van.  “Look out the window,” I told them, “watch the movie called ‘Life’.”

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They didn’t understand what I meant, but they did hush up and we did not watch a movie on the way home.  Instead they chatted, fought over some toys in the backseat, and sang Farmer in the Dell.  And I felt good about that.

Thoughts?  How do you limit  your kids’ use of technology?  Are there certain lengths of time you follow?  Certain games you encourage over others?  Have a great day!

 

 

 

Therapy Thursday: Stuck on a Ride We Can Never Get Off- Tricare’s ABA Policy in the News Again


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We, as parents of children with special needs, boarded this roller coaster of emotion sometime back, assumed at one point we could get off. Ok, maybe I am the only parent who thought this and now reality has adjusted my once jaded view, but I am getting tired of these hills and valleys we ride. And I am not talking in reference to my children. I am talking about what we all must do to provide them with the treatments they might need.

So prepare yourself this coming July 25th when Tricare once again throws another 360 loop onto our rails.

In an article published June 18, “Tricare is consolidating its disparate autism therapy programs into one Autism Care Demonstration Project for children of active-duty, retired and reserve component personnel starting July 25.”

So there you have it folks. Make sure that seat belt are tightened and all arms and legs remain inside the cart at all times. Although it appears for now the ride won’t get much more bumpier; it’s never smooth sailing.

Therapy Thursday: Making Your Own Therapy Time


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If you didn’t know, we are in the middle of a pcs (military acronym for moving to a new duty station). Due to the fact we have moved away from our last duty station and therapists and haven’t yet reached our final destination- we have had no therapy of any kind since the start of May. The lack of therapy is starting to show on our kids. The lack of routine and assistance has become an issue. A issue we can not fix until we reach our new duty station. However, no one likes to see their children regress and suffer. To help aid them we have started trying to incorporate their past therapy techniques as we can.

One tip of being on the move with your littles that are missing out on therapy is to talk with your child’s therapist before you move for helpful advice and things you can do on your own to help maintain the levels they have reached.

For example: We talked with Sb’s PT before we moved to see what fun things we can do on the move to help her progression with her coordination. She told us to go to the park and walk her up and down the stairs. She gave us further information on what exactly what to do. But the mere fact we can easily go to a park to do therapy while on vacation or during a move is awesome and more importantly; doable.

Not all therapy is so easily achieved. We don’t stress about what we can’t do and we make sure we do plenty of what we can. In the end everyone is happy. SB and the other spawn get to play and mommy and daddy feel like real parents (Compared to those alien ones that spike horns and carry a sickle when their children misbehave).