Ummm, Guess What? PLEASE READ


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Ummm,  we are moving! Err,  to a new Web address,  not another duty station. Although,  you could equate it to that. Anyways,  when we move (sooner than you think) we will need you to follow us there.

We don’t want to lose you. That could make us look like bad parents. And we maaayyyy have lost a kid or two before. Just saying… We don’t want to lose you either.

So please follow us at http://www.chaosorganized25.com

And please don’t make me beg. I look really unattractive when I do.

Back to School; Back to School; To Prove to Daddy I’m not a Fool


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First day of school for my 1st grader and kindergartener. I typically wake up a little early to take my daily medication before I actually have to get up. My medication requires me to not eat or drink for one hour after consumption. I plan it out strategically so when my alarm actually does go off I can have my coffee. Now remember how I said it was the first day of school? Yea, it’s also the one day I took the wrong medication at 5 am and can’t have my coffee until after I walk the kids to school. Yea for alarm clocks, feverishly packing school lunches because you forgot to the night before and fighting with your child over which uniform ensemble to wear. Summer vacation is over!

I’m sure a few of our readers can sing with me-

“I’ve got my shoes tied tight, my lunch bag packed; I hope I don’t get in a fight”.

Can anyone take a guess as to why I am walking around my house singing this song at the top of my lungs annoying my children today? Well you don’t have to guess, I’m so excited I just can’t wait for you-school is back in session! Bug started yesterday and Diva started today. I might even pop open a bottle of wine to celebrate. Hell, I definitely will pop open a bottle of wine to celebrate. However, I have a feeling a few of our other readers are gasping and clinging tightly to their children reading in horror as I want to celebrate the joyous occasion of only having one child left in the nest.

Let me explain; I feel like society expects us as devoted mothers to shutter and lock our children away in their rooms to never grow up and stay our babies forever. For those mommies, I found this published at Lessons from the Middle

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It’s sweet, it’s sentimental and it’s heart warming. Can I also add it’s a year jerker?

However, I’m not blowing my nose and wiping away tears that easily. The last page is filled out in the baby books (wait, did I have baby books?) and the door is closed on another chapter in our household.

I could sit her and sob over my two eldest in school and wish the baby wouldn’t grow up, but isn’t that what parents are suppose to do? We want to raise our children up and boost their self esteems to be confident people to go out and explore the world. If we let them see us cry and be sorrowful, our children will only feel like we were holding them from something bigger and better and regret us later on. What well adjusted child leaves their mother crying over leaving the nest? None. However, what well adjust parent cries tears of sorrow over their children leaving? The answer should be none.

We should be celebrating and rejoicing over their accomplishments and our own accomplishment for keeping them alive long enough to get that far. No one hands us a parenting book upon leaving the hospital. Nevertheless, at least we can provide our children with the support and lessons to conquer the world, or at least first grade, one clean Kleenex at a time.

So raise those glasses and let’s toast to another year of keeping our sanity, keeping our kids alive and keeping a promise to ourselves we will be happy for our children knowing they will one day grow their own set if wings.

How Do I Set Up My Child’s Services at Our New Duty Station?


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The dust is finally starting to settle down on our pcs roller coaster ride. The boxes are almost unpacked and I’m starting to get the layout of the land. The first important step I need to take next is to set up our children’s services. But how do I do that? Well I am here to give you a little help.

If you didn’t know- once you change Tricare regions you will need to get all new prescriptions for your referrals. We went from TriWest to TriNorth, because we switched Tricare regions we have to get new referrals before our children are able to start receiving services again. Which means we had to go to our new PCM to get the new referrals to our specialists to get the new referrals for our services and prescriptions.

I would suggest calling to make a appointment with your child’s PCM ASAP. If you are unable to get a realistic appointment day scheduled, try asking if they have a clinic case manager or speaking with someone at the base patient advocacy department. For example, we arrive mid July. We were given an appointment date of mid August. Bug has a rare medical condition that requires mail ordered supplies and medication. We would be out of those items if we waiter until the system worked. Therefore, I had to call the base patient advocacy who informed me they actually have clinic case managers. The case manager was able to get us next day appointments. Now all our referrals to their new specialists have been placed and we even have scheduled a few appointments with the specialists.

It really just takes time and patience. One last piece of advice is to alert all parties involved of your move. A month prior to our pcs I informed the medical supply company that we would be moving. They were then able to alert the new branch of our incoming and our needs. This worked well as the new branch called us and set up a delivery before we even seen by the specialist. They also called our insurance to see what needed to be done on their end to speed the process along.

A Parents Dilemma: To Tell or not to Tell Your Your Child about Their Diagnosis


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I’ve written before about a question some parents of children of ASD share- when and do we tell our children about their diagnosis.

There is a debate related to it. What does it benefit the child if we tell them? Some argue that it can cause low self esteem in children who might already feel depressed, upset or confused about themselves. The other side to the argument is some children might feel relief to know there is a diagnosed problem and it is not just a feeling. With confessing to them their diagnosis comes understanding about themselves and might make it easier for the child to manage their life. Whatever side you are on, I don’t feel there is a right side. They say “if you’ve seen one child with Autism, you have seen one child with Autism”. Every child is different; nuero typical or not. You have to decide for yourself whether your child could handle the reveal.

However, that pops a new question into my mind. Does that mean we are deceiving our children by not telling them?

I know, just recently, Bug has announced he is different than other people. His reasons are infantile and childish; he likes watching tv a lot. I want to correct him and explain that he is different. But so is Diva and SB. SB is cray cray! But I feel that parent guilt again. Am I lying to my child?

Bug is quite different from Diva. He sees the world in black and white. There are rules to follow for everything and if not he makes up his own rules to follow. He is book smart and doesn’t have a lot of common sense. He doesn’t express emotions. I want to tell him his deep secret I’ve been keeping for him. I feel he could handle it. I even feel it could help him understand why he knows he is different.

I think that’s it. I think the key to deciding if you tell your child is if they notice they are different. If they can access there is a difference between themselves and others, I think they could benefit from knowing it’s not bad to be and feel different.

Luckily, last week I was blessed with a few materials to help me blab my secret to Bug. During a EFMP intake meeting for our new duty station, we were given a bag full of great resources and books including Say Hello To Me by April Charisse and Since We’re Friends by Celeste Shally. Both children’s books depict the main character as having ASD.

It maybe not be the right decision for your child, but at this point, I feel it is the right one for mine. I know it will come with a lot of questions but I hope it will give him a lot of answers.

Of course I’ll keep you all updated on how it goes and right now I’m out of vodka to help me after the process; so it might be a few days before I get to it.

Organizing Our Chaos: Summer Hiatus


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Yesterday I posted about my summer abroad visiting family and loving life back on the mainland after FOUR YEARS (I still can’t get over that!) of island living. I’ve been sporadic with my posting and begging my co-blogger to help out. She has been amazing, but now we both are at the point mid-summer where we are just having to much fun and enjoying our family.

As you know we are a family blog. We love to share our funny, positive stories along with how to manage and organize chaos while raising children with special needs with a dash of being military wives. Enjoying your family, despite diagnosises, is our most important point we like to make. Furthermore, because of that we can going to cut back on our daily posts to live what we preach. Hopefully, we can provide you with new entertaining stories like Dirty Water and Manhood. Take the rest of the summer to read some past articles and familiarize yourself more with who we are and what we our mission.